The Right Self Image is Critical to Your Success

“Self image sets the boundaries of personal accomplishment” – Maxwell Maltz

We have two images of our self. One is the external image, which shows up in the way we walk, talk, dress etc. and the other is the internal image, how we see ourselves in our mind. The internal image dictates our personal results, for example, a poor self-image will show up as poor results in life whereas a positive, strong self-image will deliver positive, strong results. Our self-image is built partially by our genetics but more importantly by the way we grow through our childhood. If a child is raised with praise that child tends to grow into someone who likes herself, who understands herself, and who has a positive self-image. A child raised in an atmosphere of negativity and criticism tends to be super critical of herself, feels inferior, and doesn’t really understand herself; she has a poor self-image. However, we have the ability to improve our own image.

There is an image of perfection within each person, right at the center of his or her consciousness. The creative faculties we each have are often buried under piles of doubt and insecurities and we have to remove those negativities to allow the perfection to shine through. A person can enable that by studying himself or herself because the more we understand, deeply understand our self, the better the image we have of our self.

Image operates like a thermostat or autopilot mechanism. We have a programmed image, as a thermostat has a programmed set point and an autopilot is programmed with directions. Our sub conscious mind will always bring us back to our programmed image whenever we try to deviate from it. For example, lottery money winners who end up burning through their winnings because they, like all of us, are programmed with regard to their relationship with money. Their programming is such that they have never seen themselves as extremely wealthy people so they sub consciously auto-adjust back to a financial level they are used to. The self-image is a key part of our paradigm and it literally controls our life.

To change the results you’re achieving in life, really examine your self-image. Is it consistent with the outcomes you want? If not, create a new self-image. Consciously and deliberately choose the kind of person you want to be. Create a written description in the present tense; this is also known as “imagined reality”. Make yourself the star of your own movie script. Immerse yourself in the role and over time become the character you wish to portray.

This applies equally well to teams as it does to individuals. A team with a powerful image becomes a powerful force within a company. Powerful teams work together to create results; they don’t compete with each other to diminish the team performance. Harness the collective creative forces of a team for maximum effectiveness and maximum impact on the company bottom line. Coalescing a team around a common group image results in the whole team being greater than the sum of the individuals, and in turn that enables a measurably improved performance.

Where do you see opportunities to adjust your own image or that of your team to set yourself up for even greater success? I would love to hear your thoughts.

9 Comments

  1. Gifford Thomas
    August 15, 2017

    Great article

    Reply
  2. Steven Linebaugh
    August 30, 2017

    This is a wonderful post, so true and so much to think about.

    Reply
  3. Toni Portmann
    September 7, 2017

    Really well written article

    Reply
  4. Rose
    September 11, 2017

    Good article. Struggling to do what you suggest. “If not, create a new self-image. Consciously and deliberately choose the kind of person you want to be. Create a written description in the present tense; this is also known as “imagined reality”.” I have to figure out how to do this while running full speed ahead 24/7.

    Reply
    • Anne Phelan
      September 11, 2017

      Hi Rose, thanks for your comments and I agree, what I’m suggesting is not easy to do and that’s why most people don’t do it. It does take persistence and with a 24/7 life it can feel like a “nice to do” instead of a “must do”. I think it comes down to prioritization and personal choices. If you feel strongly about making a change then you will prioritize this over other things. Often we put ourselves last and see to everyone else’s needs first.
      We haven’t met and I don’t know about your life but if that least sentence resonates with you, it might be helpful to take a look at ways in which you can take time each day to focus just on yourself and create that new image.

      Reply
  5. Cathy Thomas
    September 12, 2017

    Fantastic article. I love the guided challenges provided to facilitate change. It’s one thing to talk about change, it’s another to have tools, like a compass, that can guide you there. This concept rings very true as a start up company continuing to struggle upstream. It is also true, as this concept of group identity is something we train. Thank you.

    Reply
  6. Joan Davison
    September 29, 2017

    Great article! Well written and clear on next actions. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  7. Adnan Zaidi
    October 17, 2017

    Anne, Thanks for writing this beautiful article. It is true most of the extraordinary works have been produced by people who had strong self-image and determination.

    Reply
  8. Brad Watson
    February 5, 2018

    Great article Anne! I really appreciate the intentional action steps in this paragraph that I’ve experienced as necessary to make any lasting change. So well said here…Thx
    “To change the results you’re achieving in life, really examine your self-image. Is it consistent with the outcomes you want? If not, create a new self-image. Consciously and deliberately choose the kind of person you want to be. Create a written description in the present tense; this is also known as “imagined reality”. Make yourself the star of your own movie script. Immerse yourself in the role and over time become the character you wish to portray.”

    Reply

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